New York Times

The problem for Yoplait was that authenticity – like innovation – almost never tests well. This is a common phenomenon. “Data regresses to the mean,” said James Gilmore, a professor at the University of Virginia and an author of “Authenticity: What Consumers Really Want.” “Something that’s really original, really authentic, it’s probably not going to score that well because people have a knee-jerk reaction against new things.”

more >
SC Now (Florence, S.C.)

In Faulkner’s bedroom are a couple of pairs of riding boots, as well as a placard, numbered 64, which he wore at an Albemarle County horse show. By the time he died in 1962 of a heart attack following injuries received in a riding accident, Faulkner was a Nobel Prize winner, teaching at UVA and no longer living full-time at Rowan Oak. (UVA has most of Faulkner’s papers, and the fascinating exhibit there is on display through July.)

more >
USA Today

(By Mary Kate Cary, senior fellow for presidential studies at UVA’s Miller Center) After four straight losses in recent special elections for congressional seats, on top of more than 1,030 seats lost nationally by Democrats in state legislatures, governorships and Congress since 2009, the Democratic National Committee needs to figure out the cause of what can only be called the party’s slow death.

more >
Scientific American

Businesses want to harness even more wind energy, at a cheaper price – and one of the best ways to lower cost is to build bigger turbines. That’s why an alliance of six institutions led by UVA researchers are designing the world’s largest wind turbine.

more >
Washington Post

“Made by History” will be edited by a team of professional historians. Brian Rosenwald, a historian at the University of Pennsylvania, and Nicole Hemmer, a professor and writer at UVA’s Miller Center, are the site’s editors-in-chief. Each day, you’ll find historical analyses to situate the events making headlines in their larger historical context. 

more >
The Associated Press

In December, seven law professors – including two from the University of Virginia – wrote a brief supporting plaintiffs' arguments that HB 1523 violates the principle that government should not favor some religious beliefs over others.

more >
Washington Post

That Jefferson would push back the time of a dinner by several hours is an indication for his respect for religious freedom, even though Jefferson was widely criticized in his time for his accommodation of the Tunisian envoy, said Scott Harrop, a professor of Middle Eastern and South Asian languages and cultures at the University of Virginia.

more >
Politico

Legally risky, undiplomatic and sometimes wrong, Trump’s Twitter feed is a document for the ages. And historians don’t want to lose it. Argued Russell Riley, co-chair of the oral history program at UVA’s Miller Center for presidential scholarship: “You’re given a much more up-close look at his innate thought processes than I think you’ve gotten from any other president,” he said.

more >
Charlottesville Tomorrow

One of the changes that Henderson enjoys the most is the new and improved signage around the museum. Created in collaboration with UVA graduate psychology students, it provides prompts for parents about how to engage with their children at each exhibit.

more >
Roanoke Times

Luca Connolly, a recent UVA graduate and a member of the Virginia Student Environmental Coalition, said she’s not prepared to deny Northam a vote just because of his pipelines stance. Connolly and about a dozen other members of VSEC from six Virginia universities temporarily hijacked the stage at Northam’s primary night watch party to protest the candidate’s pipeline stance.

more >
New Orleans Advocate

Miss Julia Murphy Grehan began her summer studying abroad in Lund, Sweden, where she worked with sustainability and business systems. The University of Virginia student will bring back information from this international learning experience for her studies as a systems and information engineer at the Charlottesville school.

more >
Times-Picayune Nola.com

Elizabeth Lockwood Atherton: An incoming junior at the University Virginia, she is a Spanish language and culture major and a technology entrepreneurship minor, a member of the Sigma Alpha Lambda Honors Society and the University of Virginia chapter of Love your Melon, an organization benefiting childhood cancer patients.

more >
Slate

(By UVA Ph.D. candidates Sophie Abramowitz, Eva Latterner and Gillet Rosenblith) Even as Corey Stewart’s campaign ended, the fights over Confederate monuments in Charlottesville continued. They might soon reach a new fever pitch, and as they do it’s worth considering an overlooked piece of history around these statues: Their role in displacements of former black residents.

more >
Virginia Business Magazine

The Virginia Biosciences Health Research Corp., known as Virginia Catalyst, announced it has awarded almost $3 million to six collaborative bioscience commercialization projects, including INSPIRE brain cancer treatment, a product of VoltMed Inc. of Blacksburg and Virginia Tech and the University of Virginia. The company was spun out of UVA and is “developing a tumor treatment platform that selectively destroys brain cancer cells, including malignant glioma,”

more >
TES.com (U.K.)

Harry Potter fans include famous names such as Barack Obama, Prince William, Stephen King and one that tickles me the most: cognitive scientist Daniel Willingham. “It’s wonderful writing and a wonderful narrative,” the reading expert and UVA professor of psychology says. But did the Hogwarts phenomenon actually boost literacy levels in children?

more >
OZY.com

The Gates Foundation has poured resources into polio eradication, which has been criticized by some because of how expensive it is to combat the last few cases in hard-to-reach areas. Perhaps those funds could be better spent elsewhere? “Typically we would think that’s a public health decision that should be decided by democratically elected governments,” says Jennifer Rubenstein, a UVA professor of political theory. “The only reason that the Gates Foundation is getting to make it instead is because Bill Gates has a lot of money.”

more >
Washington Post

Last week, when Otto Warmbier finally came home, people tied ribbons to the trees that arch over the main street here and to the wooden street signs hanging from wrought-iron scrolls in this close-knit suburb of Cincinnati.

more >
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution

A group of two dozen colleges and universities calling itself Universities Studying Slavery are working together to study the history of slavery in higher education and the legacy of racism on campuses. The group includes the University of Virginia, University of South Carolina, Clemson University and Georgetown University.

more >
CNN

The Ohio hometown of Otto Warmbier, who died last week after his return from 17 months in detention in North Korea, gathered at the 22-year-old's alma mater Thursday to bid him farewell.

more >
Washington Post

On June 20, the University of Virginia held a candle light vigil for Otto Warmbier.

more >