Forbes

“The perception is that you can’t get a visa to enter the United States, there is no immigration to the United States, and there are no jobs available for any foreigner in the U.S.," said Scott Beardsley, dean of UVA’s Darden School of Business. “This is just not the reality we are seeing on the ground.”

more >
WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

UVA is moving forward with plans to make the Lawn more wheelchair accessible. The Board of Visitors approved the project Thursday.

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

Today, a growing number of Central Virginians avoid red meat. The allergy has been linked to the bite of the lone-star tick, which is most commonly found in Virginia, Tennessee, southern Missouri and Oklahoma. A new study by a collaboration of UVA allergists and cardiologists has cautiously linked that allergen to an increased risk of heart disease.

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

UVA will move forward this summer with the installation of wheelchair ramps that would allow, for the first time, disabled visitors, students, staff and faculty to move the length of the Lawn.

more >
Inside Higher Ed

The University of Delaware Press and the University of Virginia Press have announced a collaboration. The Delaware press will maintain editorial offices and its editorial board, but the UVA Press will provide manuscript editorial, design and production services.

more >
Live Science

People with a rare red meat allergy may have a higher risk of heart disease, a new study suggests. The lone star tick's saliva may contain alpha-gal, said lead study author Dr. Jeff Wilson, an allergy research fellow at the UVA Health System. So, when the tick bites a person, it exposes the individual to the alpha-gal and may trigger an immune response in the body. Then, when that person eats red meat and some dairy products, the body responds by producing antibodies to alpha-gal, Wilson said.

more >
WVIR-NBC-29 (Charlottesville)

Type 1 diabetes is not a preventable disease, but it's one that can hit at any time in a person's life and forever change the course of it. That's what happened to Marshall McIntyre, a Charlottesville man who was forced to start life over. UVA Orthopedic Trauma Director Dr. David Weiss did part of his residency as a flight surgeon. He was trained for what happens in the Air Force in cases like McIntyre's. “There are certain positions that are considered disqualifying, and how disqualifying depends a little bit on what your job is,” said the doctor.

more >
The Washington Post

(Commentary by James A. Coan, a UVA psychology professor) I study how the brain transforms social connection into better mental and physical health. My research suggests that maintaining close ties to trusted loved ones is a vital buffer against the external stressors we all face. But not being an expert on how this affects children, I recently invited five internationally recognized developmental scientists to chat with me on a science podcast I host.

more >
CBS 8 San Diego

Sen. Cory Booker worked to fire up Democrats on Saturday night in a state where the party made significant gains in 2017 and this year is targeting House seats in districts that were previously considered safe Republican territory. Larry Sabato, director of UVA’s Center for Politics, said in an interview on Friday the dinner draws the "hard core of the hard core" of Democratic officials and activists. "The reason why they put somebody like Cory Booker in the main speaker slot is to pique interest," Sabato said. 

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

(Commentary by Bob Gibson of UVA’s Cooper Center for Public Service) Virginia’s 8.5 million residents live in a rolling landscape of change as populations grow in some areas, gray in many localities and shrink in dozens, providing a native Virginia demographer a fascinating job tracking those changes. Hamilton Lombard, 31, makes sense of the numbers.

more >
The Washington Post

(Commentary by James A. Coan, a UVA psychology professor) My research suggests that maintaining close ties to trusted loved ones is a vital buffer against the external stressors we all face. But not being an expert on how this affects children, I recently invited five internationally recognized developmental scientists to chat with me on a science podcast I host.

more >
“With Good Reason”

(Podcast with Ben Converse, assistant professor of public policy and psychology) Slow-motion replays are ubiquitous in the world of sports, but may be problematic when used in courts of law. 

more >
Washington Post

The notion of human rights began to take shape after the Holocaust, so it is not surprising that Jews played an important role in their emergence. In his new book, UVA historian James Loeffler explores how a small group of Jewish lawyers and activists from around the world inspired the human rights movement and the creation of entities such as the United Nations that, sadly, have failed to fulfill the promises of their ideals.

more >
Washington Post

UVA nutrition expert Sibylle Kranz says that for both kids and adults, “weekend dietary intake is very different from weekday. On weekend days, we seem to have more of what we call ‘celebration food.’ It’s birthday parties, or going to the pool and getting something from the vendors there, or families getting together and having big meals.”

more >
FIND MBA

UVA’s Darden School of Business has announced a new competitive scholarship program designed to support MBA students who are focused on entrepreneurship, innovation and technology.

more >
Charlottesville Tomorrow

Ice hockey at the University of Virginia has seen two iterations, from 1973 to 1978 and more recently from 1995 to this season’s final hurrah. Both teams experienced success, but the privately owned ice arenas that were their homes have been repurposed. Four UVA alumni associated with those early years and a former coach of the men’s team want to make sure version three is permanent and sustainable.

more >
MD Magazine

“This novel finding from a small group of subjects from Virginia raises the intriguing possibility that allergy to red meat may be an underrecognized factor in heart disease,” said study leader Dr. Coleen McNamara, a professor of medicine in the Cardiovascular Research Center of the UVA Health System. “These preliminary findings underscore the need for further clinical studies in larger populations from diverse geographic regions and additional laboratory work.”

more >
Medical News Today

For some time now, scientists have believed that allergies, in general, may set off an immunological chain reaction that leads to atherosclerosis, or a buildup of fatty plaque in the arteries that hardens over time, narrowing the blood vessels. However, the mechanisms that underpin this process are not understood. In the new study, researchers at the University of Virginia Health System wanted to dig deeper. So, they devised an experiment to investigate whether individuals with red meat allergies might be more susceptible to atherosclerosis and, if so, why.

more >
Charlottesville Daily Progress

On June 4, Scott White, the commissioner of insurance for the SCC, sent a letter of guidance to insurers. The new legislation is compliant with state and federal laws, and will take effect on July 1, he said – despite requests from companies to consider a later date, or to allow limited signup periods. White’s statement and the Richmond guidance might help keep prices down, said Carolyn Engelhard, an associate professor at the University of Virginia and director of its health policy program.

more >
Forbes

(Commentary by Bernie Carlson, Vaughan Professor of Humanities and chair of the UVA’s Engineering & Society Department) Over the past few weeks, the news about Facebook and social media in general has been quite poor. 

more >