Updates Regarding Missing University Student

October 13, 2014

Hannah Elizabeth Graham, a second-year student in the University of Virginia’s College of Arts & Sciences, disappeared in the early morning hours of Sept. 13. Below is a list of University communications released in the wake of her disappearance.

On this page:

Oct. 24, 2014

Oct. 13, 2014

Oct. 4, 2014

Sept. 26, 2014

Sept. 23, 2014

Sept. 21, 2014

Sept. 19, 2014

Sept. 18, 2014

Sept. 17, 2014

Sept. 16, 2014

Sept. 15, 2014


Oct. 24, 2014

President Sullivan’s Statement Regarding Hannah Graham

To the University Community:

It is with tremendous sadness that I write to inform you of the confirmed death of second-year U.Va. student Hannah Graham, who had been missing since early on the morning of September 13.

Hannah showed great promise as a student and as a young woman. She brought immense energy and delight to her learning at the University, and she was a source of friendship and joy for so many people here at the University and abroad, particularly her friends on the ski team. Thomas Jefferson wanted students here to fulfill “destinies of high promise.” For Hannah’s young life to end so tragically, and for her destiny of promise to be left unfulfilled, is an affront to the sanctity of life and to the natural order of human events.

This is a sorrowful day in the life of the University, and our entire community is grieving with the Graham family. We offer our sincere condolences for their loss, and we will continue to hold them in our thoughts and prayers in the days ahead.

Teresa A. Sullivan
President

 

Oct. 13, 2014

Statement from John and Sue Graham Marking One Month Since Hannah Graham Went Missing

It is now a month since our precious daughter Hannah disappeared.

We would again like to express our thanks to Chief Longo, Mark Eggeman, their teams, and all of the wonderful people who have dedicated so much of their time to help search for Hannah. Words cannot adequately express our gratitude to them, and to the many others who have provided us with support throughout this ordeal.

We truly appreciate the enormous effort that is being made to find Hannah. It is heart-breaking for us that the person or persons who know where Hannah is have not come forward with that information. It is within their power both to end this nightmare for all, and to relieve the searchers of their arduous task.

Again, we would like to urge anyone who has not already searched their property in the city of Charlottesville, or any of the neighboring counties, to please do so today.

Please, please, please help us to bring Hannah home.

Thank you.

John and Sue Graham


Oct. 4, 2014

Statement from Sue and John Graham Regarding the Ongoing Search for Their Daughter Hannah

“My name is Sue Graham. At my side is my husband John. As you know we are Hannah's parents. I will now read a brief statement.

Firstly, we would like again to express our enormous gratitude to all those who have been involved in the search for Hannah, including the police, the professional search teams, the people staffing the telephone tip line, UVa students, our friends, neighbours and work colleagues as well as the citizens of Charlottesville and the surrounding area. We would also like to thank the many, many kind people who have supported our family during this terrible ordeal through words, deeds, thoughts and prayers. We also owe our sincere thanks to the City of Charlottesville, the University of Virginia and the concerned citizens who have contributed a total of $100,000 to the reward which is being offered for information leading to Hannah's return. We have been overwhelmed by the generosity of you all.

As you are all aware, an individual has been charged with the abduction of our beloved daughter Hannah. However, despite extensive search efforts, no trace of Hannah has been found since she disappeared in the early hours of Saturday September the 13th, now more than three weeks ago. The police have received thousands of tips, and to each one of you who made the effort to call in with information, we express our heartfelt thanks. We also thank all of you who have actively searched your properties and reported the results to the police. However, despite all your efforts, Hannah is still missing.

Somebody listening to me today either knows where Hannah is, or knows someone who has that information. We appeal to you to come forward and tell us where Hannah can be found. John has already said that this is every parent's worst nightmare. That is true, but it is also a nightmare for our son, James, for Hannah's grandparents and other members of our family, as well as for all of Hannah's many friends here in Charlottesville and beyond. Please, please, please help end this nightmare for all of us. Please help us to bring Hannah home.

Thank you."


Sept. 26, 2014

Message from President Sullivan to Students

Several events are occurring this weekend on Grounds and in the Charlottesville area that offer occasions for you to socialize and gather with friends – but also to consider your safety. This evening, Final Friday will be held beginning at 5:30 p.m. on the Arts Grounds, and the Tom Tom Founders Festival will hold an event celebrating innovation and the arts, including recognition of several members of the U.Va. community. On Saturday, our football team will host Kent State at Scott Stadium at 3:30 p.m. Our volleyball and field hockey teams will also compete in Charlottesville this weekend. On Sunday, the Foxfield Fall Races will hold its 2014 Fall Family Day.

If you plan to attend these or other events this weekend, please remember to make responsible choices, to look out for one another, and to be aware of the resources that are available to you and others. 

The University Transit Service offers extended late night service on the Outer U-Loop and the Northline routes on Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights from 12:30 a.m. until 2:30 a.m. 

If you are in the city, you can call Yellow Cab Charge-a-Ride at 434-295-4131 to travel by taxi. If you do not have the money to pay for the taxi, you need only to show a valid student ID to the Yellow Cab driver and sign the document the driver will provide to you. You will then be billed through your student account.

The University operates up to four Safe Ride vans that provide door-to-door transportation for current students with a valid student ID who might otherwise have to walk alone at night when buses are not in operation. Safe Ride operates Sunday through Wednesday, 12 midnight to 7 a.m., and Thursday through Saturday, 2:30 a.m. to 7 a.m.

The Safe Ride service area includes most student housing areas in the vicinity of the University Grounds (Safe Ride Map). A ride can be arranged by calling 434-242-1122.

All of us need to be active bystanders. Walk in groups, call 911 if you or a friend needs help or if you see something that requires police action, and ask for help if you need it. You can use our new “TipSoft” program to submit crime tips anonymously. Information about TipSoft and the free “TipSubmit” phone app is on the University Police site.

Student leaders will be distributing orange ribbons at the football game as a show of support for Hannah Graham and her family. 

As we remain hopeful for Hannah's safe return, please remember to consider your own safety and the safety of your fellow students.

Teresa A. Sullivan
President


Sept. 23, 2014

Message Regarding University Community Safety

To the University Community:

For more than a week, we have hoped and prayed for Hannah Graham and her family. Her safe return remains our highest priority, and I continue to urge you to share with police any information that might be related to the case by calling the dedicated tip line at 434-295-3851.

As the investigation has progressed, I have heard from students, parents, employees, community members, and others who have offered their thoughts and expertise. Many have also given generously of their time through volunteer efforts. I am very grateful for this outpouring of support.

We also have heard comments related to safety and security, and I write today to acknowledge those concerns and continue to address them.

We have taken several specific steps to enhance security and to increase resources available to the University community.  Along with local law enforcement, our University Police Department has increased patrols and the presence of officers. The University has expanded the number of vans operated through our SafeRide program. This fall, we introduced a new program called "TipSoft" that students can use to submit crime tips anonymously. Information about TipSoft and other resources can be found at the University Police site. We encourage all members of the University community to download this free app.

Last Friday, Student Council President Jalen Ross sent a message to students that focused on safety issues and resources. Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer Patricia Lampkin echoed many of the same points in a message to parents. Both of these safety-related communications, and all of the University's messages, can be found at this site.

These steps are a beginning, and we will continue to gather information and examine how we can make our University community as safe as possible.

All of us have important roles to play in this ongoing effort. Learning about the resources that are available to you can help you avoid putting yourself at risk. Look out for one another, and call 911 if you need help or suspect a problem. Let's help each other stay safe, as we continue our search for Hannah Graham.

Teresa A. Sullivan

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this message that was emailed to the University community incorrectly stated that the University has expanded the hours of operation for the SafeRide program. The accurate SafeRide hours are here. The University has increased the number of SafeRide vans in operation.


Sept. 21, 2014

Letter from President Sullivan to the University Community

Dear Friends in the Community:

As we continue to search for Hannah Graham and to hold out hope for her safe return, I write to thank the many members of our University, Charlottesville and surrounding communities who have stepped forward to provide both emotional support and physical assistance. More than 1,200 volunteers, including many University students and local citizens, participated in the search for Hannah on Saturday, and search crews fanned out across Charlottesville and parts of Albemarle County again Sunday.

As you heard from Hannah's parents, Susan and John Graham, during a press conference today, our shared goal as a community is to locate Hannah and to return her safely to her family, and we will draw upon all of the University's resources to do so.

We are grateful to the Virginia Department of Emergency Management and the coalition of public agencies that have come from across the Commonwealth and beyond to assist with the search. Times of crisis often produce a heightened sense of collaboration and teamwork, and this has been true over the past week as we have come together with our colleagues in a unified effort to find Hannah.

We are cooperating fully with law enforcement authorities as they continue their investigation. If you have any information that might be helpful, no matter how inconsequential it might seem to you, please call the dedicated tip line at 434-295-3851.

The pursuit of truth is the paramount purpose of a university. The members of the University of Virginia community and our friends and neighbors will not rest until we know the truth that lies at the heart of Hannah Graham's disappearance. Please keep holding Hannah and her family in your thoughts and prayers.

Teresa A. Sullivan
President

 

Statement Read by John and Susan Graham at Press Conference Today

Ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon. My name is John Graham. I am Hannah’s father. This is Sue, Hannah’s mother, and my wife.

As this nightmare for Hannah for us, for Hannah’s big brother James, for her grandparents and extended family continues, Sue and I would like to make this statement.

We have been utterly overwhelmed by the generosity of spirit of everybody we have met this week, and many more besides whom we’ve been unable to meet. We understand that over 1,000 volunteers took part in yesterday’s search and a similar number of wonderful people are out today looking for Hannah. Sue and I were out searching: so were some of our work colleagues, friends and neighbors from our home and Hannah’s friends from high school and softball team.

But the effort is much wider. Members of the Charlottesville community turned out in force to help. Armies of Hannah’s university friends are helping. I read that a gentleman came from as far away as Baltimore, Maryland to help. Thank you sir. Alexis Murphy’s aunt, Trina, was helping. Thank you ma’am. Sue and I thank all of you from the bottom of our hearts.

The reason that Hannah has such marvelous support is that is every parent’s worst nightmare. I am certain that everybody in the room and watching who is a parent knows that what happened to Hannah could happen to their child. We need to find out what happened to Hannah and make sure that it doesn’t happen to anybody else.

You have all read about Hannah, I am sure. You will have read that Hannah is a second-year student at the university of Virginia, a skier, a musician and a softball player. She likes to help people and is interested in a career helping others. For example, last spring break, instead of hanging around on a beach or sleeping, Hannah spent a week in Tuscaloosa, Alabama contributing to the relief effort after the devastating tornado.

That is one Hannah. But Hannah is also our little girl. Our only daughter and James’ little sister. Hannah is also the oldest granddaughter of both my own parents and Sue’s parents, my parents’ only granddaughter. And while you think of our pain, consider them, an ocean away, not knowing what happened to their cherished granddaughter, Hannah, and unable to help.

Somebody knows what happened to Hannah. And others watching may know something helpful and may not even realize it. We know Hannah was downtown early on Saturday morning. Hannah was distinctively dressed. Did you see Hannah? Do you think you might have seen Hannah? Please, please, please call the tip line with anything that might just help us to bring Hannah home.

Sue and I have received countless messages of support. I would like to read one email we received this morning from one of Hannah’s high school teachers:

“I am sure you are continually being inundated with hundreds of people reaching out daily, but I just wanted to touch base again to express some of my hope and confidence.

“Throughout the week as I spoke with Hannah’s friends and teachers, and the countless other people whose lives have been bettered by Hannah's passion and positivity, one theme shone brightly through each conversation: hope. Not because that's what people feel like they should say at a time like this, but because of who Hannah is. Hannah is brilliant, resilient, determined, and loves life more than anyone I know. Everyone agrees, if anyone could get through this, it is Hannah.

“I've been trying to frame my thoughts with the idea that every moment that passes we are one moment closer to having Hannah back. Let's hope today is the day.”

When I returned home from bringing Hannah to Charlottesville for the start of term last month. I found she left this little guy behind. This is BeBe, Hannah’s white rabbit. He was given to Hannah when she was just one week old by one of my friends. BeBe helped out in Tuscaloosa. And was Hannah’s constant companion, friend and guardian angel until last month. Constant companion, that is, except for about six months when Hannah was 3 years old when he was lost at her nursery school. Bebe was found and came home to Hannah and to us.

All we want is to bring Hannah home safely. Please help us.

Thank you.
 


Sept. 19, 2014

Information for U.Va. Parents from the Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer

Dear Parents:

As the week comes to a close and the weekend begins, I know that you, like all of us, are anxious for any available updates about the disappearance of second-year student Hannah Graham. News media in Charlottesville and beyond are posting updates from the Charlottesville Police, and these reports are the best source of information at this time. We continue to update our main website with all related communications from the University.

I want to express the collective thanks of the University to all of you who have written with words of encouragement, expressions of hope, and prayers for Hannah, her family, and friends. Although you may not have received an individual response, please know how much we appreciate the support of each of you. You are part of our extended UVa family.

Last night, students held a vigil for Hannah in the Amphitheater. This event was a tremendous display of hope and strength on the part of our students, still so young in their experience but so genuine in their capacity to comfort and care for others. Hannah's parents, John and Sue Graham, attended the vigil and wrote today to express their thanks.

We continue to encourage students to maintain their daily routines but not "to go it alone" if they need to speak with someone, whether a counselor, a staff member in the Office of the Dean of Students, a Resident Staff member, a faculty or staff member, or another resource within the community. I know that many faculty members are talking about this crisis in their classes, as well as reminding students of basic safety habits.

Increased police patrols on the Grounds and in areas where students congregate will be noticeable this weekend, and in fact, increased patrols already were in place earlier in the semester. In anticipation of upcoming weekend activities, Student Council President Jalen Ross wrote the student body to emphasize once again the importance of personal safety and watching out for one another. Please read his message here. His message links to a Staying Safe tip sheet that succinctly lists important phone numbers, resources, and reminders. Please encourage your students to be familiar with everything available to help them be safe and get support. If your student finds that any service is not being fulfilled as described, please let us know, and we will follow up.

Hannah's disappearance is likely to elicit one of the strongest instincts you have as a parent – to keep your daughter or son physically and emotionally safe. The single most helpful thing that you can do to create that safety is to talk with her or him. Given the complexities and fluidity of Hannah's situation, having those conversations with your student is easier said than done. I hope the following suggestions are helpful:

Don't try to change what your daughter or son is feeling. This sounds counterintuitive because, as parents, you may feel that it is your "job" to reduce your child's discomfort. Young people, however, feel most supported when they simply feel understood and validated. If you try to reason your student out of feeling scared, angry, sad (or whatever she or he is feeling), you will likely lose your opening for good communication. Instead, convey that you "get it," whatever "it" is. Try saying "Hey, I want you to know I really care about what you are going through … I'm going to be here for you." Then, just listen – it is one of the most precious gifts a parent can offer a daughter or son who is hurting.

Find your own support. It is with good intention that parents often unconsciously seek to alleviate their own anxiety by making their daughters and sons "feel better."  It will be very hard to enact the "Don't try to change what your student is feeling" idea if you are not getting your own support from someone who cares about you.

Provide good information about safety. Make clear, concise suggestions about how your daughter or son can keep herself or himself physically safe. Encourage your student to remain in the company of two other people when outside at night. Make sure she or he knows about Safe Ride (434-242-1122) and the University Transit System, both of which can provide safe transportation throughout the evening and early morning hours. More information is available in the Staying Safe tip sheet.

Suggest CAPS.  Ask that your student consider talking with a counselor at Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS), particularly if she or he is not feeling safe or struggling to get to class. The best way to access CAPS at a time like this is to have your student walk in anytime between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday. CAPS is located in Student Health at the corner of Jefferson Park Avenue and Brandon Avenue. If your student would rather schedule some time with a CAPS counselor, she or he can do so by calling 434-243-5150. In addition, CAPS will be open throughout this weekend (Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.). Please call or have your student drop by. CAPS also will be available throughout the weekend to facilitate group meetings/discussions with affected student communities on Grounds.

Lastly, CAPS is here for you as well. If you would like to consult with one of the CAPS counselors about how to support your student, just call 434-243-5150 to speak with one of our counselors.

In her remarks at the vigil last night, President Teresa Sullivan talked about the challenge of maintaining hope while simultaneously feeling so much concern and anxiety. This is a big calling for all of us, especially our students, but we also know this crisis is the human condition laid bare. Much of what our students learn at UVa occurs outside the classroom. This is not an experience we would ever plan for them, but the kindness and great strength of the UVa community is pulling us all together.

We are here for you and your students, and we are grateful for all you are doing as part of the larger UVa community. We will continue to communicate with you in the days ahead.

Sincerely,
Patricia M. Lampkin
Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer

 

CAPS holding weekend hours to support students

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS) in Student Health will be open for extended hours throughout the weekend to assist students as they cope with Hannah Graham’s disappearance and as they learn of any new developments in the case. Extended hours of operation for the weekend are:

Friday, Sept. 19, 5 to 9 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 20, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Sunday, Sept. 21, 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

CAPS also will be available throughout the weekend to facilitate group meetings/discussions with affected student communities on Grounds.

Students can reach CAPS during the above hours this weekend (and during other regular business hours) at 243-5150. Outside of these hours, students can reach the CAPS 24-hour emergency on-call clinician by calling 972-7004. CAPS is located in the Elson Student Health Center at 400 Brandon Avenue (at the intersection of Brandon Avenue and Jefferson Park Avenue).

In a message to parents, Vice President Patricia M. Lampkin offered suggestions on how parents can talk with their students about their feelings and concerns during this difficult time. Parents also are invited are invited to call CAPS at 434-243-5150 if they would like to consult with one of the CAPS counselors.

 

Stay Safe This Weekend Message from U.Va. Student Council President Jalen Ross

Fellow Wahoos,

We are coming to the end of a long, emotionally difficult week. Last night's vigil was an important moment for joining together and drawing strength from one another as we search for answers in the disappearance of Hannah.

As we head into the weekend, I want to encourage you, more than ever, to think about your personal safety and how we can be supportive of one another. Hannah's disappearance shows just how vulnerable we can be. We need not live in fear, but we must acknowledge the reality of threats to our safety and well-being. Moving forward together and with the help of others, we can keep ourselves safe in a world that is often not.

For a list of resources, tips, and phone numbers, please see the Staying Safe tip sheet.

Some reminders:

  • If you need help or see something suspicious, call 911. The police want you to call.
  • Walk with others at night. Avoid dark, deserted areas, even if you're with a friend.
  • Keep your doors and windows locked.
  • Be familiar with the University's blue-light phone system (see Staying Safe tip sheet).
  • When you go out, especially to parties, have a plan with your friends for getting there and getting back safely. Check in with your friends throughout the evening and make sure everyone leaves together.
  • If you drink, know your limits and know how certain factors, such as body weight, gender, food consumption, medication usage, and rate of drinking affect intoxication.
  • Do not leave a friend who has had too much to drink.

Please stay safe, and take care of one another.

Jalen Ross
President, UVa Student Council

 

Message from John and Sue Graham to the University Community

Dear Members of the UVa Community:



Last night, we attended the candlelight vigil organized by the students at the University of Virginia. We found the vigil to be extremely moving and would like to offer our sincere thanks to the students for arranging the event and to the University for enabling our attendance.



We were comforted by the evident high esteem in which our cherished daughter is held by her many friends at the University of Virginia and beyond.



We continue to be optimistic that Hannah will soon be returned safely to us. We repeat our previous appeal to contact the Charlottesville Police Department if you have any information that could help the Department’s enquires.



Lastly, it is now Friday, a week since Hannah’s disappearance. For those students planning to unwind this weekend, please be extra vigilant when you are out and walk with a buddy.



John and Sue Graham

 


• Sept. 18, 2014

Volunteers can help in search for Hannah Graham

Local and state emergency officials are seeking volunteers to assist with a mass search for Hannah Graham planned for early Saturday, Sept. 20. Graham is a student at the University of Virginia who has been missing since Saturday morning.

All volunteer searchers are subject to a background check and must register online no later than 5 p.m. Friday. Anyone who is unable to register online can register in person at John Paul Jones Arena (295 Massie Road in Charlottesville) prior to the 7 p.m. Friday volunteer briefing. Only those who have registered will be permitted to participate in Saturday’s search.

Volunteer searchers must:

  • Be at least 18 years old
  • Carry NO weapons
  • Bring a copy of the registration form and driver’s license
  • Wear proper footwear and clothing for weather and conditions
  • Bring water to stay hydrated
  • Indicate on registration if they have previous military and/or search-and-rescue experience
  • Be physically in shape for walking/searching in up to four-hour periods

• Sept. 17, 2014

Statement from the Parents of Hannah Graham, Read at Charlottesville Police Press Briefing

Hannah is beyond precious to us, and we are devastated by her disappearance. It is totally out of character for us not to have heard from her, and we fear foul play. We are in constant contact with the Charlottesville Police Department and the University of Virginia.  
 
We have learned CPD has received many helpful leads from the public. We are very grateful for all information already provided and urge members of the public to continue to call the dedicated tip line, with anything at all, however small it seems.
 
We would also like to recognize the many messages of support we have received from Hannah's friends at UVA, her friends from high school, band and softball team, as well as our neighbors, friends and work colleagues, too many to count.
 
Although we are British, Hannah has lived in Virginia since she was five. This is her home and we have always felt welcome here.

We are so very grateful for everyone involved in the search for Hannah. Like you, we will not rest until we find her and she comes home.
 
Once again, if you have any information at all, however insignificant it may seem, please call 434-295-3851. Thank you.
 
 John and Susan Graham

 

Message from U.Va. Student Council President Jalen Ross

Fellow Wahoos:



It is with a heavy, but hopeful, heart that I write to you today.



As most of you know, early Saturday morning, Hannah Graham, one of our own, went missing. The authorities continue the relentless effort to bring her home safely.



We cannot--and must not--lose hope at this moment. In fact, it is now that Hannah's family and friends, as well as those conducting the search for her, need our support most.



I know that this is exactly the kind of need that our community will step up to meet, and I know that many of you have already made great efforts to support one another.



I invite all of you to take that support one step further by joining your peers in a Candlelight Vigil to Bring Hannah Home. We will meet in the Amphitheater on Thursday, September 18, at 9 p.m. to show support for Hannah, her loved ones, each other, and this community we call home.



I hope to see you there.



Jalen Ross

President, UVa Student Council

 

Message from President Sullivan to Alumni

By now you have most likely heard the news of the disappearance of Hannah Graham, a second-year UVa student who has been missing since early Saturday morning. All of us on the Grounds are anxiously hoping that she will return home safely very soon. The Charlottesville Police are leading the investigation of her disappearance, and we are offering all possible assistance to them and to the Graham family. 



We are making sure that students are aware of the resources that are available to help them with the anxiety and uncertainty they may feel during this difficult time. Yesterday, UVa Dean of Students Allen Groves sent a detailed message to our students; you can read the message from Dean Groves here. Students have launched a “Help Find Hannah Graham” page on Facebook here. 



The members of our University community form an extended family. This family includes our alumni and friends across the country and around the world. Just as families draw closer during times of crisis, let us draw together now as a UVa family, united by our concern, as we continue to hold Hannah Graham and her family in our thoughts and prayers. 



Very truly yours,

Teresa A. Sullivan

 

Message from President Sullivan to Parents of U.Va. Students

All of us on the Grounds are anxiously hoping that missing UVa student Hannah Graham will return home safely. The Charlottesville Police are leading the investigation of her disappearance, and we are offering all possible assistance to them and to the Graham family.



During this difficult time, we have resources available to help our students with the anxiety and uncertainty they may feel. Yesterday, UVa Dean of Students Allen Groves sent a message to our students with many helpful suggestions; you can read the message from Dean Groves here.



We are encouraging our students to maintain their daily schedules. Having structure in their day will help them in coping with uncertainty, and I hope that you will encourage your sons and daughters to stay on track. If your son or daughter seems to be in distress, do not hesitate to refer them to professional counseling if you believe it would be helpful for them. UVa's Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) department has trained clinicians who can help students manage anxiety or other emotions they may be feeling. A student may call CAPS at 434-243-5150 to schedule an appointment during the daytime, or at 434-972-7004 after hours if they need help in a crisis situation.



You are perhaps the most important resource for your student. Many students will seek advice and reassurance from their families. If you become concerned about your student's resilience or health, please let me, Vice President Pat Lampkin, or Dean Groves know of your concerns.



We need the strength and comfort we can offer one another at this difficult time, as we continue to hold Hannah Graham and her family in our thoughts and prayers.



Very truly yours,



Teresa A. Sullivan

President


• September 16, 2014

Statement From Family of Hannah Graham

Hannah Graham’s family issued the following statement today regarding the disappearance of their daughter, a second-year student at the University of Virginia. Hannah has been missing since early Saturday morning, and law enforcement officials are actively searching for her. The family asks that the public and news media respect its privacy at this time.

“Since learning of Hannah’s disappearance, we have been heartbroken and at the same time heartened by the outpouring of support and help we have received. We remain hopeful that Hannah will be found soon. We urge anyone with any information, however insignificant it may seem, to call a newly dedicated tip line at 434-295-3851 at the Charlottesville Police Department.

“Those of us who know and love Hannah know that she would not disappear without contacting family or friends. She is highly responsible and organized. She embraces life with energy and enthusiasm and has enriched the lives of many. Her empathy is evident in her daily interactions with us and her friends. She loves the University of Virginia, and all summer she was looking forward to the start of the new school year. U.Va. is her intellectual home, a place that stimulates her thinking on a broad variety of topics. Socially, she has found kinship and passion with her fellow members of the Ski Team.

“We express our sincere gratitude to law enforcement and everyone who is involved in the search for Hannah. We also thank the University for the full attention they are devoting to the situation. The kindness and support of so many – her friends at U.Va., particularly her friends on the Ski Team, her friends from high school, our neighbors, and the larger community – mean so much to us at this difficult time.

“Please join us in our fervent wish for Hannah’s safe return home. Once again, if you have any information at all, however insignificant it may seem, please call 434-295-3851.”

John, Susan, and James Graham

 

Message from President Sullivan to Faculty and Staff

All of us on the Grounds are anxiously hoping that Hannah Graham will return home safely. The Charlottesville Police are leading the investigation of her disappearance, and we are offering all possible assistance to them and to the Graham family. 

During this difficult time, we have resources available to help our students with the anxiety and uncertainty they may feel. The Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) department in Student Health has trained clinicians who can help students manage anxiety or other emotions they may be feeling. A student may call CAPS at 434-243-5150 to schedule an appointment during the daytime, or at 434-972-7004 after hours if they need help in a crisis situation. CAPS is located on the street level in the Elson Student Health Center, 400 Brandon Avenue, just off of Jefferson Park Avenue.

We are encouraging our students to maintain their daily schedules. Having structure in their day will help them in coping with uncertainty, and I hope that those of you who teach and support our students will help them stay on track. If students come to you in distress, I know that you will be understanding and listen to them carefully, but you should also not hesitate to refer them to professional counseling if you believe it would be helpful for them. Remember that our staff members in the Office of the Dean of Students are ready to assist you with any concerns you may have. During regular business hours, you can contact the Office of the Dean of Students directly at 434-924-7133; after hours, you can call 434-924-7166. 

Being older, many of us have already experienced frightening and disorienting events in our lives. Your wisdom from coping with such experiences may now help you in helping our students. But events such as Ms. Graham’s disappearance may also arouse within you, no matter how experienced you are, unpleasant emotions and memories that are hard to encounter. Please be aware that our Employee Assistance Program is available for you; you can call 434-243-2643, or find information here. You may also find helpful some of the suggestions in a message to students from Allen Groves here.

The Charlottesville Police Department has a new, dedicated tip line at 434-295-3851. We continue to urge anyone with any information, however insignificant it may seem, to call the police.

During this very difficult time, I urge you to pay special attention to students who may be in distress, and also pay attention to your own well-being. We need your calm and wisdom in addition to your dedicated service in these distressing days.

Very truly yours,

Teresa A. Sullivan
President

 

Message from Dean of Students Allen Groves on Community Resources and Safety

The University of Virginia community has been deeply affected by the recent report that a fellow student, Hannah Graham, has been missing for several days. Our thoughts remain with her family at this difficult time. Please know that the University is supporting them. Yesterday morning, you received an email from University Police Chief Mike Gibson, and Vice President Patricia Lampkin wrote to your parents to also inform them of this concerning case.

I have heard from a number of students in the past two days, offering their hope that Hannah will return safely (I share this hope) and also expressing their own concern and anxiety over Hannah’s disappearance. The UVa community is a tight-knit family, and an event like this touches a great many of us quite deeply. At such a difficult time, I want you to know that there are resources available to assist you if needed.

The Counseling and Psychological Services (CAPS) department in Student Health has trained clinicians who can help you manage stress, anxiety, or other emotions you may be feeling. You will find them very welcoming and helpful. You may call CAPS at 434-243-5150 to schedule an appointment during the daytime, or at 434-972-7004 after hours if you need help in a crisis situation. CAPS is located on the street level in the Elson Student Health Center, 400 Brandon Avenue, just off JPA.

In addition, our professional staff in the Office of the Dean of Students is available to assist you. Our main office is located on the second floor in Peabody Hall, upstairs from the Office of Admission. You can stop in or call 434-924-7133 to schedule an appointment. In addition, if you live in a University residence hall, you should feel free to approach your RA and seek his or her support and a referral to other services. The main office of the Housing and Residence Life unit of the Office of the Dean of Students is located on the lower level of the Kent/Dabney residential community in the McCormick Road first-year living area. Professional staff located there are available to support and assist you as well.

I also want to make certain that you are aware of safe transportation options that exist in the area surrounding the University, particularly late at night on weekends.

Safe Ride operates up to three vans that provide door-to-door transportation for current students with a valid student ID who would otherwise have to walk alone at night. Hours of operation are Sunday through Wednesday from 12 midnight until 7 a.m., and Thursday through Saturday from 2:30 a.m. to 7 a.m. The service area includes most student housing areas in the vicinity surrounding the University Grounds (Safe Ride Map). A ride can be arranged by calling 434-242-1122. One Safe Ride van picks up passengers near the Alderman/Clemons Library every half hour during operating hours, when the library is in operation, Sunday through Thursday mornings.

University Transit Service (UTS) offers extended late night service on the Outer U-Loop and the Northline routes on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday nights from 12:30 a.m. until 2:30 a.m.

In addition, if you are unable to wait for a Safe Ride van pickup, are not near a UTS bus route late at night, or otherwise feel unsafe, please remember that you may call Yellow Cab Charge-a-Ride at 434-295-4131 to travel by taxi. If you do not have the money to pay for the taxi at that point in time, you need only show a valid student ID to the Yellow Cab driver and sign the document they will provide to you. You will then be billed through your student account.

Lastly, I want to stress the importance of being an active bystander at all times. Walk in groups, step in if you see a peer in a potentially unsafe situation, call 911 if you observe a situation that appears to require immediate police action, and always ask for help or assistance if you need it yourself. Charlottesville Police and University Police officers maintain an active presence in the area surrounding the University Grounds, and they will be promptly dispatched when 911 is dialed.

The police welcome any and all information that may be helpful in finding Hannah. If you have any information, however insignificant it may seem, please call a newly dedicated tip line at 434-295-3851 at the Charlottesville Police Department.

Please be safe, look out for each other, and help keep UVa the caring community we know it to be. #hoosgotyourback

Sincerely,

Allen Groves

University Dean of Students


• September 15, 2014

President's Message Regarding Missing University Student

The University of Virginia has issued the following statement of President Teresa A. Sullivan, regarding the report of a missing U.Va. student:

The members of the University of Virginia community are united in our deep concern for Hannah Elizabeth Graham, who is missing and has not been in touch with her family or friends since early Saturday morning. The Charlottesville Police Department is investigating this case, and has been conducting an extensive search since learning of Ms. Graham’s disappearance. Our University Police Department was notified of the report Sunday evening, and this morning has contacted all students, faculty and staff to make them aware of the situation. Our Office of Student Affairs has provided this information to parents as well.

Anyone with information regarding Ms. Graham is asked to contact the Charlottesville Police Department at 434-970-3280 or Crimestoppers at 434-977-4000. A photograph of Ms. Graham may be found at this link: http://www.virginia.edu/graham/. We are hopeful that someone will come forward soon with information that will lead the authorities to Ms. Graham.

Teresa A. Sullivan
President

 

Message to Parents from the Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer

I am writing to alert you that the below message went out this morning to more than 40,000 members of the UVa community in Charlottesville – all students, faculty, and staff. We are deeply concerned about the whereabouts of Ms. Graham, and local law enforcement have been involved in an extensive search since learning of her disappearance.
To repeat from the below message: Anyone with information regarding Hannah is asked to contact the Charlottesville Police Department at 434-970-3280 or Crimestoppers at 434-977-4000.

Please keep Ms. Graham's family and friends in mind during this difficult situation. We will share more details as they become available.



Sincerely,


Patricia M. Lampkin
Vice President and Chief Student Affairs Officer

 

Message to the University Community from the Chief of University Police

The Charlottesville Police Department is investigating a missing person incident involving a University of Virginia student, Hannah Elizabeth Graham. Hannah is a white female and 18 years old. She is approximately 5'11" tall with a skinny build. She has blue eyes, light brown hair and has freckles. She was last seen wearing a black crop top with mesh cut outs. The last contact she had with friends was via text message at 1:20 a.m. on September 13, 2014.

A photo of Hannah is available here: www.virginia.edu/graham.

Anyone with information regarding Hannah is asked to contact the Charlottesville Police Department at 434-970-3280 or Crimestoppers at 434-977-4000.



Michael Gibson

Chief, University Police

Media Contact

Anthony P. de Bruyn

University Spokesperson Office of University Communications