An associate professor in the University of Virginia’s School of Nursing is using a $2.2 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to help prostate cancer patients make more informed decisions about their care.

Randy Jones said a prostate cancer diagnosis brings many questions: Is incontinence inevitable? Will out-of-pocket costs crush me? Will sex ever be an option again? For some patients, even knowing what questions to ask is difficult.

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Area charities are welcoming the new year with extra enthusiasm as a result of charitable giving from University of Virginia employees.

The 2016 Commonwealth of Virginia Campaign concluded at year’s end exceeding $1 million in donations from UVA employees. The University’s campaign also tied the record-breaking percentage of online gifts at 44 percent of total giving.

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On Sunday, the eyes of the entertainment world will be on the Dolby Theatre in Hollywood as the curtain rises on the 89th annual Academy Awards.

The much-hyped musical “La La Land” could break the record for the most Oscars ever won by a single film. “Hidden Figures” or “Life, Animated” – both films based on books by University of Virginia alumni – are also poised for an exciting night, up for the best picture and best documentary statuettes, among others.

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There is a new nickname for people who have their faces buried in their electronic devices: “smartphone zombies.” The worry that a distracted user, eyes downcast on his or her phone, might step into the path of an oncoming car has so rattled one city in the Netherlands that it is experimenting with a new lighting system. New LED light strips embedded in sidewalks signal smartphone zombies when it is safe to cross the street.

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In 1974, four years after the University of Virginia first admitted undergraduate women, a room in the newly built drama building was fitted with mirrored walls and ballet barres. These were the first of UVA’s dance amenities that students and faculty had been advocating for, hoping to provide more resources for students passionate about dance.

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Duchenne muscular dystrophy affects one in 3,500 boys, stealing their ability to walk by age 12 and typically killing them by their mid-20s. Doctors know what causes the muscle-wasting disease, but, frustratingly, experimental treatments consistently fail. University of Virginia researchers are out to change that, however, with the help of a $2.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health.

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Let there be light. And let there be information.

A University of Virginia engineering professor and her former graduate student have refined an alternative to Wi-Fi, and they have formed a company to market the concept. The technology is called “Li-Fi,” because it uses LED light waves to transmit data.

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Melur K. “Ram” Ramasubramanian has been appointed the University of Virginia’s vice president for research, UVA President Teresa A. Sullivan announced today.

Ramasubramanian will assume this position on Aug. 8 and will report to the president. He is currently program director for the Engineering Research Centers program at the National Science Foundation and D.W. Reynolds Distinguished Professor and department chair of Mechanical Engineering at Clemson University, with a joint faculty appointment as professor of bioengineering.

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­­Bryan Cranston – New York Times best-selling author and award-winning actor, screenwriter, director and producer – will be the University of Virginia’s special guest for the third annual UVA President’s Speaker Series for the Arts. Cranston will share reflections on his career as an artist and the impact that the arts have on our lives, education, and the world.

Academy Award-winning producer and University alumnus Mark Johnson will moderate the conversation, hosted at UVA’s John Paul Jones Arena on March 26 at 2 p.m.

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Two drugs used to treat asthma and allergies may offer a way to prevent a form of pneumonia that can kill up to 40 percent of people who contract it, researchers at the University of Virginia School of Medicine have found.

Influenza pneumonia results when a flu infection spreads to alveolar air sacs deep within the lungs. Normally, a flu infection does not progress that far into the lower respiratory tract, but when it does, the results can be deadly.

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The University of Virginia’s ROTC programs are looking for blood donors to support the military.

They will host a blood drive on Feb. 27 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the Newcomb Hall Ballroom, with a team from the Fort Bragg Blood Donor Center collecting blood to be used for the military in its medical centers. All blood types are welcome, although types AB and O are in the most demand. Walk-in donations are welcome; however, donors are encouraged to make an appointment using an online registration system.

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A single small burial room in the ruins of Pueblo Bonito in Chaco Canyon held the richest cache of rare and valuable materials – turquoise, silver, abalone and conch shells – ever found in the American Southwest.

Now, researchers have determined for the first time – through mitochondrial and nuclear DNA testing – that the individuals interred there more than 1,000 years ago were related through the female line and most likely part of an elite lineage or clan.

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He’s had teams that won this event and then, three months later, stumbled in the NCAA tournament. He’s had teams that were knocked out of this event, only to capture the NCAA title in the spring.

Whatever happened Monday at the Boar’s Head Sports Club, then, was not going to render a final judgment on head coach Brian Boland’s latest men’s tennis team at the University of Virginia. Still, as Boland surveyed the jubilant scene around him after top-seeded UVA’s 4-1 win over third-seeded Ohio State, he loved what he saw.

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The most senior member of Virginia’s congressional delegation, U.S. Rep. Robert C. “Bobby” Scott, addressed students at the University of Virginia on Monday, discussing how Congress can move forward in a time of paralyzing gridlock.

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University of Virginia linguistic anthropologist Mark A. Sicoli and colleagues are applying the latest technology to an ancient mystery: how and when early humans inhabited the New World.

Their new research, which uses “big data” techniques to analyze more than 100 linguistic features, suggests complex patterns of contact and migration among the early peoples who first settled the Americas.

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Since its 2010 founding, Instagram has grown from a plucky photo-sharing mobile app into a cultural behemoth with more than 600 million users. Businesses took note: within a year of launching a broad ad platform in 2015, more than 500,000 advertisers were paying to reach its users monthly.

The man at the helm of the company’s business operations is University of Virginia alumnus James Quarles, a 1997 mechanical engineering graduate who is now vice president of business at Instagram.

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Physicians and patients like to believe that early detection of cancer extends life, and quality of life. If a cancer is present, you want to know early, right?

Not so fast.

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Originally established in 1885 as George Washington’s Birthday, Presidents Day is now widely considered a day to reflect not just on the first president of the United States, but all those who have held the office.

Robert F. Bruner, professor and dean emeritus at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, has not just reflected on these leaders, and not just for a day; he’s formally researched their qualities and delved into one of the most interesting facets of their leadership: general, prevalent optimism.

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University of Virginia economics professor James Harrigan is using more than 35 years of data to study economic inequality in the United States, seeking explanations and solutions for the rapidly widening chasm between the very rich and nearly everyone else.

His undergraduate course, “Economic Inequality,” helps students understand the nuances of the contentious topic, which found its way to the heart of national conversation in the recent presidential election.

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Shakespeare’s Juliet famously asked, “What’s in a name? That which we call a rose, by any other name would smell as sweet.” She argued that Romeo’s surname, Montague – that of her family’s rival house – was a mere title with no real bearing on his “dear perfection” to her.

New research shows that public policy may benefit from the same untethering. A recent study by the University of Virginia’s Craig Volden suggests that lawmakers are more receptive to new policy proposals when they’ve been scrubbed of references to the rival “house,” or political party.

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